health

Turned away at restaurants, borders and even your workplace

51 1

a group of people sitting at a table: MailOnline logo

Australians could be banned from restaurants, shops, and offices if they refuse to get a Covid-19 vaccine.

Using public health orders, states and territories have the power to mandate vaccinations for certain activities and professions such as aged care workers who can be required to get an up-to-date flu jab. 

Last month NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian suggested she may allow private venues such as bars, shops and workplaces to set their own rules for Covid-19 jab requirements.  

a group of people sitting at a table eating food: Australians could possibly be banned from restaurants, shops and offices if they refuse to get a Covid-19 vaccine. Pictured: A bar next to the Sydney Opera House

Australians could possibly be banned from restaurants, shops, and offices if they refuse to get a Covid-19 vaccine. Pictured: A bar next to the Sydney Opera House

'We'll consider whether we allow venues... to make up their own rules if they have a business or run a workplace about what they feel is Covid-safe,' she told radio 2GB.

In November Qantas boss Alan Joyce said he would update the airline's terms and conditions to require passengers to be vaccinated - and said many other airlines will do the same.

'We will ask people to have a vaccination before they can get on the aircraft... for international visitors coming out and people leaving the country we think that's a necessity,' he told the Nine Network. 

The federal government will update the MyGov and Express Plus Medicare apps to provide Australians with proof of vaccination. 

Vaccinated residents will also be able to print a hard copy of their certificate from a Services Australia site or a vaccine provider.

a group of people in a store: Last month NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian suggested she may allow private venues such as bars, shops and workplaces to set their own rules. Pictured: Sketchers

Last month NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian suggested she may allow private venues such as bars, shops and workplaces to set their own rules. Pictured: Sketchersa man sitting in front of a computer: In early January Mr Morrison said he wanted the states and territories to adopt the same rules over vaccinations. Pictured: An office

In early January Mr. Morrison said he wanted the states and territories to adopt the same rules over vaccinations. 

'Australians need to have that record depending on state public health orders but also when traveling and borders open up again,' Government Services Minister Stuart Robert told reporters on Sunday.

'When it comes to workplace laws they are the purview of the states and territories. We would be expecting them to issue public health orders if they see fit so I will leave that to the states and territories,' he added.

In early January Mr. Morrison said he wanted the states and territories to adopt the same rules over vaccinations. 

He said National Cabinet discussions 'will include the necessity for state governments and territory governments to harmonise and ensure and national consistency in public health orders which is the process by which any requirement to have the vaccine is made legal across Australia.' 

a group of people standing in front of a store: The federal government will update the MyGov and Express Plus Medicare apps to provide users with proof of vaccination. Pictured: Residents shopping at David Jones

The federal government will update the MyGov and Express Plus Medicare apps to provide users with proof of vaccination. Pictured: Residents shopping at David Jones

The first batch of vaccines is due to arrive in Australia in mid-February and the first jabs are expected to be administered at the end of the month. 

The vaccines will be rolled out in five stages. Quarantine and border workers, frontline health workers, and aged care staff and residents will be first. 

Next will be anyone over 70 years old, other healthcare workers, people with medical conditions, emergency service workers, some high-risk workers like meat processing workers, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are over 55.

After that, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 to 54 will get the jab, as well as Aussies over 50 and other high-risk workers.

text: The vaccine will be rolled out in five stages. Quarantine and border workers, frontline health workers and aged care staff and residents will be first

The vaccine will be rolled out in five stages. Quarantine and border workers, frontline health workers, and aged care staff and residents will be first

The fourth phase will encompass all adults and then a final phase will be for children - but only if experts say kids need the jab at all. 

Explaining why children are last, Health Secretary Professor Brendan Murphy said: 'We know that children are at very low risk of getting Covid and transmitting Covid and the vaccine has not yet been thoroughly tested against children.' 

Mr. Morrison is targeting 80,000 vaccinations a week in February and wants this number to rapidly increase to issue four million jabs by the end of March. 

The vaccines will be distributed to each state based on the number of priority people that need the vaccine, regardless of the number of infections. 

Initially, between 30 and 50 hospitals will be used as hubs to distribute the Pfizer vaccine.

Then general practice clinics, existing Commonwealth GP respiratory clinics, and other state-run vaccination clinics will be used. 

Each will issue only one type of vaccine so patients don't get confused about which jab they have had.

The Pfizer jab is much more difficult to distribute because it must be stored at -70C so the AstraZeneca jab will be the one sent to remote populations.  

Initially, imported doses will be used before Australia begins producing its own vials of the AstraZeneca jab at the CSL factory in Melbourne.       

a man cutting a cake: A nurse gets vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in Paris, France on Thursday 6 January

A nurse gets vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in Paris, France on Thursday 6 January

1 Comments

  • Suvir

    Suvir

    11:36 AM, 15-03-2021

    My sister got the Pfizer jab a few days ago. Works on the front lines as an emergency doctor. Will be interesting to see if Australians get that draconian as to turn away people who haven’t been vaccinated.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Related News